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Healthy Soils Are Full of Life

Healthy Soils Are Full of Life was the theme for the newly launched poster contest. Students from 3rd grade classes in Putnam County were asked to participate in a poster contest, on a voluntary basis. Some of the schools chose to skip this year, hopefully they will participate next year. Out of the schools that participated some had the school’s adopters purchase the poster boards for the students while other schools the teachers purchased the poster boards for the students. Those were the schools that had the most success. Other schools still participated but did not have as large of a turn out of posters.

            Each school had an opportunity to have 3 student winners, 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. The students that won 3rd place won $10.00, 2nd place won $15.00, and 1st place won $25.00 and had their name entered to win a Chromebook. Also, out of the 1st place winners one was picked to move onto the state TACD contest where they were able to win more money and have an opportunity to move onto the national NACD contest. There were also incentives for the teachers. The teacher from each school that had the 1st place winner received $25.00 to spend on their class and the teacher that had the district winner was given $100.00 to put back into their class.        

Besides the incentives that were offered to the students they were encouraged to participate in the contest, so they could let their voices be heard. These students are our future and if we can help them understand where their food and other natural resources come from then we can have a better tomorrow. At the end when all the posters were collected we had a wonderful selection of carefully crafted posters to pick from.

The schools that participated were Sycamore, Cornerstone, Capshaw, Jere Whitson, and Northeast. The district winner that went on to the State TACD poster contest was Bella Hitchcock from Northeast Elementary. Her poster is pictured. Next year we hope to have all the 3rd grade students in Putnam County participate in this wonderful opportunity.

**All programs and services of the Putnam County Soil Conservation District (SCD) are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activities.      


 

To Tree or Not To Tree?

 

That is the question? The Putnam SCD has conducted a Spring tree sale for several years. Usually in March of each year. However, the research has shown that is not the opportune time to plant trees. According to the leading research the best time to plant trees is in the fall. In part, this time is best because of soil temperature. Research has shown that until soil temperatures drop below 50 degrees roots continue to grow. This shows that planting trees in late fall or early winter promotes root growth. The warming temperatures in spring typically allows the foliage to outgrow the root system and deplete the tree of needed nutrients. This process will usually cause a much higher mortality rate in spring planted trees.

 

Spring time is when most plants come to life and we want to get outside and get our hands dirty. Planting trees, working gardens and flowerbeds are all on the top of our list of things to do in springtime. However, trees survive the cold winter months based on the nutrient they have stored in preparation for the winter. In the fall trees need less carbohydrates because the tree is going into a winter dormant state. The tree allows the root system to absorb nutrients and prevents the shoots of the tree itself from getting all the carbohydrates.

 

So, planting trees in the spring would reverse this process and allow the needed nutrients or food to go into new plant and shoot growth. In reality it starves the root system of those nutrients. This process actually stresses the tree and could cause it to die. Therefore, Spring planting of trees have much higher mortality rates. This process takes place the same way for shrubs and ornamentals.

 

This is not to say you cannot spring plant trees and shrubs, it just is not recommended by professionals in that field of study.

 

This brings us back around to the Putnam County Soil Conservation District tree sale. The SCD board made a decision to go to the late fall and early winter with this year's tree sale. The date for the 2018 tree sale will be determined later but it will be late November or early December. The SCD certainly appreciates the public support of our tree sale and would like to thank TTU Soil staff and Dr. Janice Branson for the dedication and continued support for our annual tree sale.

 

Watch the Putnam County SCD face book page for the date of our sale. It will also be ran in the Herald Citizen a couple of weeks before as well.

 

*By: Darrell Beason, District Conservationist

**All programs and services of the Putnam County Soil Conservation District (SCD) are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activities.      

 

News Release

News Release

USDA Announces Sign Up for NWQI Pilot Watershed Project

Agricultural producers located in Caney Fork and Nolichucky River Watersheds are eligible to apply

Applications are due by Friday, April 13, 2018.

Please read the latest news release on our TN website by clicking here.

You may also learn more about Tennessee NWQI by visiting the website.

 Non-Discrimination Statement:

All Programs and services of the Putnam County Soil Conservation District (SCD) are offered om a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activities. 

 

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Our Mission

The mission of the Putnam County Soil Conservation District is to protect and conserve the natural resources of the county for landowners, land users, units of government, educators and organizations by finding and taking available technical, financial, and educational resources and making them available to our clients without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, religions, age, disability, political beliefs, and marital or familial status.

Our History

The Putnam County Soil Conservation District, organized under the provisions of the Tennessee SCD Enabling Act of 1939, officially became a soil conservation district on February 19, 1941, following a referendum in which 322 landowners voted for and 16 against the organization.

 

 

The referendum was held at four polling places, namely Double Springs, Cookeville, Baxter, and Twin Oak communities....

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